Methemoglobin reduction in vitamin K deficient chicks
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Methemoglobin reduction in vitamin K deficient chicks

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Published .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby George H. Barrows.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 50719 (Q)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationxi, 99 leaves.
Number of Pages99
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1826097M
LC Control Number89893051

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Vitamin K deficiency results in a reduction in prothrombin content of the blood, and in the young chick, plasma levels are as low as 2% of normal. Because the prothrombin content of newly hatched chicks is only ~40% that of adult birds, young chicks are readily affected by a vitamin K–deficient diet. THE REDUCTION OF METHEMOGLOBIN BY ASCORBIC ACID* BY CARL S. VESTLING (From the Division of Biochemistry, Noyes Laboratory of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana) (Received for publication, November 4, ) In this laboratory a study of the oxygen capacities of chemically modified hemoglobins has recently been undertaken. Charles Chazot, Joel D. Kopple, in Nutritional Management of Renal Disease, Vitamin K. Vitamin K metabolism has been well reviewed [14,15].Two classes of compounds, phylloquinone (K 1) and menaquinones (K2), are primarily responsible for vitamin K quinone (Table ) is found essentially in green and leafy vegetables (e.g., spinach, kale, cabbage, and broccoli) and cow. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin stored in fat tissue and the liver. It is best known for its role in helping blood clot, or coagulate, properly. Vitamin K also plays an important role in bone health. There are 3 forms of vitamin K. Presentation of Vitamin K Deficiency Chickens with vitamin K deficiency have delayed blood clotting, and will excessively bleed even with minor injuries.

Vitamin K deficiency results in a reduction in prothrombin content of the blood, and in the young chick, plasma levels are as low as 2% of normal. Because the prothrombin content of newly hatched chicks is only ~40% that of adult birds, young chicks are readily affected by a vitamin K-deficient diet. Methylene blue is the first line. It accelerates the enzymatic reduction of methemoglobin by NADPH-methemoglobin reductase and also reduces to leucomethylene blue that, in turn, reduces methemoglobin. This is contraindicated in patients with G6PD deficiency (can cause hemolysis). Hyperbaric O2 and exchange transfusions can also be utilized. Methemoglobin constitutes 3% or less of the total hemoglobin in normal humans. Under normal circumstances, these levels in humans are maintained at 1% or less by the methemoglobin reductase enzyme system (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NADH]–dehydratase, [NADH]-diaphorase, erythrocyte cytochrome b 5). Appendix B: Phytonadione (Vitamin K) Dosing Guidelines INR > , No significant bleeding Repeat INR; hold warfarin. Monitor INR every hours. Consider oral phytonadione at a dose of to 5 mg (INR reduction expected to occur within 24 hours). Resume warfarin at a lower dose when the INR approaches the therapeutic range. Repeat INR; hold.

  For example, a vitamin K deficient, seriously ill patient is unlikely to benefit greatly from a vitamin K intervention, but a patient with a chronic inflammatory disease may. This can only be highlighted in large community studies, which need to be run . Vitamin K (menadione) 3, Menadione is approved only for veterinary use in Canada. Z: Zopicl MeHb levels ranging from % to % have been reported in patients following large overdoses of zopiclone.   Vitamin deficiencies are easy to prevent and if caught quickly, treatable. They are also not contagious, so there is no need to isolate the affected chick. Often if chicks or chickens show signs of vitamin deficiencies and treatment is started, symptom improvement is seen in a couple of days.   During investigations of the phenotypic diversity of hemoglobin (Hb) E β thalassemia, a patient was encountered with persistently high levels of methemoglobin associated with a left-shift in the oxygen dissociation curve, profound ascorbate deficiency, and clinical features of scurvy; these abnormalities were corrected by treatment with vitamin C. Studies of erythropoietin production before.