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Geological Hazards A Sourcebook (Oryx Sourcebooks on Hazards and Disasters) by Timothy M. Kusky

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Published by Greenwood Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Environmental impact of natural disasters & phenomena,
  • Geological surface processes (geomorphology),
  • Natural disasters,
  • Science,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Earth Sciences - Geology,
  • Science / Earth Sciences,
  • Geophysics,
  • Geodynamics

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages312
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8739130M
ISBN 101573564699
ISBN 109781573564694

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Geological Hazards: A Sourcebook. From tidal waves and sandstorms to lava flows and glaciers, natural geological processes are often hazardous to human life. This book examines the scientific principles behind these processes, explaining how and why they pose a frequent threat. In this book we present a summary account of hazards which nowadays are usually classified as geological: earthquakes, faulting, tsunamis, seiches, vol­ canoes, avalanches, rock and soil slides, differential settlement and liquefaction of soil, and : Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.   Geological Hazards is the first book to consider both natural and man-made disasters in a single volume. All major geological hazards are examined. It presents a state-of-the art survey for students on civil engineering and physical geography courses, as well as researchers and practicing civil engineers.   Geologic hazards pose the greatest threat to human safety for any geotechnical undertaking, but it is ultimately the engineer's ability to recognize and cope with these hazards that will determine the safety of life and property. Armed with Geologic Hazards: A Field Guide for Geotechnical Engineers you will be able to properly recognize, understandCited by:

Institute of Geology and Geoinformation, Geological Survey of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 7, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki –, Japan. UNESCO – EOLSS SAMPLE CHAPTERS NATURAL AND HUMAN INDUCED HAZARDS – Vol. I - Geological Hazards: Earthquakes, Landslides and Tsunamis - Li Juan and Chen Yong ©Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS) magnitude m= (which is the same as that released by the explosion of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima in ), and the seismic energy . As geologic hazards go, volcanic eruptions make for good photo ops, with fiery red lava and large ash clouds flowing from mountaintops. The nature of a volcanic eruption and, thus, the hazards it presents vary depending on the type of volcano . Geologic hazards cause billions of dollars in property damage and kill thousands of people every year. The damage is usually not covered by your homeowners insurance policy.

Geological Hazards is the first book to consider both natural and man-made disasters in a single volume. All major geological hazards are examined. It presents a state-of-the art survey for students on civil engineering and physical geography courses, as well as researchers and practicing civil engineers. A geologic hazard is one of several types of adverse geologic conditions capable of causing damage or loss of property and life. These hazards consist of sudden phenomena and slow phenomena: Sudden phenomena include: avalanches (snow, rock, or air & snow) and its runout. earthquakes and earthquake-triggered phenomena such as tsunamis. Geological Hazards: Their Assessment, Avoidance and Mitigation by Fred G. Bell. Natural hazards cost the global economy over $50, million per year. Two thirds of this is spent on damage repair, the remainder represents the cost of . Attribution: Natural Hazards, Geologic Hazards Science Center, Natural Hazards, Earthquake Hazards Program, Region 7: Upper Colorado Basin, California, United States of America. Year Published: Structural control on megathrust rupture and slip behavior: Insights from the Mw Pedernales Ecuador earthquake.